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Darwinopterus robustodens and modularis by paleosir Darwinopterus robustodens and modularis by paleosir
Two Darwinopterus species (there's another one, linlontaensis, but that's for another day)

Darwinopterus robustodens is the largest Darwinopterus, and it has the most robust snout and teeth. It also has a fairly short tail.
It has a roughly 90 cm wingspan, roughly crow sized.

Darwinopterus modularis has smaller, thinner teeth and would likely be inclined to eat smaller prey.
It had a wingspan of roughly 80 cm.


Both likely ate insects and small terrestrial vertebrates, while foraging on ground and in trees, like modern songbirds, but different kinds of insects.
Where modularis might have preferred small beetles, spiders, soft invertebrates and aquatic animals, robustodens probably hunted large beetles, lizards, and large flying insects.

Compared to Pterorhynchus and the local anurognathids, Darwinopterus had very small claws and fingers, so it probably was a very bad climber compared to the aforementioned pterosaurs.
As opposed to climbing, they probably foraged on the ground, and around waterways.

Their flight capability would have been moderately good. While these animals could probably fly well, they were not at all built for high speed, to carry much weight, exceptional stamina or very high maneuvrability.
Instead, they were like modern songbirds such as common blackbirds, in terms of flying.

Another interesting thing to note about Darwinopterus, are the huge hyoid bones (also present in Pterorhynchus).
These bones anchor the tongue, and vocal cords.
In Darwinopterus, the hyoids are very large and robust, indicating they either had very strong tonues such as woodpeckers or chameleons, or that they just had very strong and load vocalisations, again, reminiscent of modern songbirds.
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:iconthedubstepaddict:
TheDubstepAddict Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Slenda birbs
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:iconglavenychus:
Glavenychus Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2017  New Deviant Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Do you give these pterosaur actual lips?
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:iconpaleosir:
paleosir Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
 Blasphemy < yes
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:iconglavenychus:
Glavenychus Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2017  New Deviant Hobbyist Traditional Artist
No, I actually really like that you gave these type of pterosaurs some sauropsid lips instead of the usual keratinous sheath. You and Pterosaur-Freak's Dimorphodon are the only few reconstructions out there that gave them this feature.
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:iconpaleosir:
paleosir Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thanks.
I consider it likely for (basal) toother pterosaurs (those without too freaky teeth, because I see no way how you can cover Scaphognathus's teeth with lips).
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:iconglavenychus:
Glavenychus Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2017  New Deviant Hobbyist Traditional Artist
True, there are exceptions, but I still wonder why most would automatically give every pterosaur a toothy beak, when the basalmost members don't show any indications for this already derived feature. Heck even Anurognathids are rather derived pterosaurs but they do would possess fleshy lips.
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:iconwdghk:
WDGHK Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Cool, thought I miss the days when it was thought to be an air born predator.
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:iconpaleosir:
paleosir Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thanks!
The idea of it being an aerial predator was a pretty shallow conclusion by the original author, it doesn't really strike me as an aerial predator. Thin snout, thin humerus, pretty conservative wings, small pointy teeth....

For aerial predators you need to look at Campylognathoides.
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:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2017
Campylognathoides seems to be the only aerial-hunting pterosaur we have found so far. Thick jaws, robust humeri, huge powerful wings, large teeth...
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:iconpaleosir:
paleosir Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Correct.

Though there's always a chance we already have found such an animal, but haven't recognised it as being so.
Even short winged pterosaurs such as scaphognathines aren't completely ruled out as aerial predators.
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:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Mar 21, 2017
Scaphognathines seem more like low-altitude pouncers iMHO, like mustelids or something. 
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:iconpaleosir:
paleosir Featured By Owner Mar 21, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I agree, but they have more variety than given credit for.
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:iconwdghk:
WDGHK Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Intresting, and did you hear about the current thoughts on Harpactognathus by scientists. Aerial hunter or ground forager?  
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:iconpaleosir:
paleosir Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yeah I know.
Scaphognathines in general are now considered to be ground foragers, not unlike seriemas, caracara's and secretary birds.
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:iconkingovrats:
KingOvRats Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2017   Traditional Artist
Loving the colours and poses:)
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:iconpaleosir:
paleosir Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you
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:iconoxalaiaq:
Oxalaiaq Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2017
A singing pterosaur! So cool :D
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:iconpaleosir:
paleosir Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Well, for all we know it could have produced a hellish screeching sound XD
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:iconoxalaiaq:
Oxalaiaq Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2017

I'll fool myself and pretend they were singers :P, it's more "comforting" than to think they just screamed out loud. (It would be very unpleasant :( )
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:iconpaleosir:
paleosir Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Well, there's a lot of sounds that can be made.
But singing is not one of them (you'd need a syrinx for that, and pterosaurs do not have that).

But honks, hisses, screeches, whistles, clicks, bellows, grunts and such are all possible.
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:iconoxalaiaq:
Oxalaiaq Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2017
By by singing pterosaurs, I never forget the 1:30 we had together :cries:
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:iconpaleosir:
paleosir Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
There's a lot of cool sounds animals make without syrinx :) (Smile) 
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:iconoxalaiaq:
Oxalaiaq Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2017
Well we don't have one and there are some guys that can make same crazy sounds xD
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